Pennsylvania is the 10th strictest stat for gun laws


Whatever the reason may be, it could be in your interest to purchase a gun. Before you buy though, there are some things to consider about Pennsylvania’s regulations.

The Brady Center to Prevent Gun Violence rates Pennsylvania as the 10th strictest state in the U.S. when it comes to firearm laws.

Background checks are performed through Pennsylvania Instant Check System, known as PICS.

According to Pennsylvania law, residents cannot purchase guns if they are convicted or indicted of crimes (including domestic violence and misdemeanors,) fugitives, under restraining orders involving children or partners, illegal immigrants, illegally using controlled substances or dishonorably discharged from the military.

Those who have renounced U.S. citizenship, or have been deemed “mentally ill” are also unable to buy a firearm.

Though in Pennsylvania, a license is not required to “open-carry,” or visibly display a gun. A permit is needed to conceal the weapon.

That means registry of the weapon is unnecessary if it is visible on your person, and if a gun is acquired in another state as long as it was bought legally from a registered dealer.

Firearm dealers need to possess a license if they sell handguns, yet long barrel guns like a shotgun can be dealt privately.

Records of purchase are kept in a database, but this does not include weapons brought to Pennsylvania from other states.

So how about age. What is “old enough” to have a firearm?

Eighteen, according to state law, unless the minor is supervised by a guardian or any adult with parental consent, or if the minor is hunting game.

Of course, in either instance, the activity must be lawful, such as for sport.

In order to conceal a weapon, Pennsylvania requires the licensee be 21 or older.

The background investigation for this permit is more comprehensive than dealer’s reviews at purchase time.

The amount of guns you own is not limited.

Though these laws are current, it is important to consider changes that may come in the foreseeable future and stay up to date if you own or plan to own a gun.


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