The Learning Center lends a hand to students


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The learning center offers tutors to students seeking help in their academics. 

College can be a stressful period in our lives, not just during finals week. For students that feel like they could use some extra help with a class that they might be struggling in or want to learn new study habits, the Learning Center can be a very helpful place.

The Learning Center at Shippensburg University is located in Ezra Lehman Memorial Library on the first floor behind Starbucks. For any student looking for academic help, they can find there are a wide variety of services offered from the Learning Center.

“The Learning Center has several components,” said Director of the Learning Center Sabrina Marshall PhD, “We have course based tutoring which is tutoring for a specific course, for example if you are taking an accounting course you can come in and get tutoring in that accounting course. We also have writing tutoring and a writing studio which is help for writing for any course, whether it’s biology or a literature class”.

The tutors that are available in the course based tutoring and writing studio are all peer tutors. Grad assistants help out in these areas, but they are mostly Shippensburg students who help tutor. These students who want to help tutor must have already taken the course that they plan on tutoring on and must have received a B grade or better in the course. Marshall says that many of these students are accounting majors.

No matter what a student may need, the Learning Center is sure to have something there for them that can help. Marshall went on to describe what can be offered for students that may be struggling academically.

“We also have learning specialists, which are professional level staff that work with students who are having either some academic challenges, are struggling or they just want someone to help them develop a plan to make them more successful”.

Learning specialists are professional level staff with master’s degrees. They help students with many issues they may have, including those who have test taking problems and helping alleviate test taking anxieties that students may have.

Marshall explained the Academic Improvement Program, or AIM Program, which is in place to help students who are on academic probation.

“They work with graduate assistants and our professional learning specialists that work in that area. In that program, students take a couple of assessments in the beginning. They develop an individualized education plan that when working with a graduate assistant, when they meet they go through the students goals, how to stay on track, how not to procrastinate, and whatever else the student is struggling with. “

No matter what level of help a student needs, whether it is assistance for writing a paper or help with an entire course, the Learning Center is there for them. However, Marshall warns that students should not wait too long before making an appointment.

“I would encourage somebody to do is come to the learning center even if you want some support in a class. Please do not wait until you’re failing a class or you’ve fallen so far behind that it’s going to be hard to dig themselves out of it”.

Marshall suggests that students should look ahead at their schedules and see which classes might give them trouble. If a student feels that they could use some help in said classes, they should come in early to the Learning Center. Asking for help may be a little intimidating, but the Learning Center staff is filled with friendly people who are eager to help students reach their potential.

If you’d like to make an appointment with the Learning Center, they can be reached at (717)477-1420 and are open Monday through Thursday from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m., and on Sunday form 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. Students can also make an appointment by talking to the reception staff at the Learning Center. For more information, go to learning.ship.edu. 


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