Terror attacks resonate with students


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It has been 12 years since the September 11 attacks, but many clearly remember the attacks on the Twin Towers and Pentagon. The United States has memorialized the heroes and loved ones lost that day. Many SU students were affected by the attacks in a different ways.

Most SU students were in between 1st and 4th grade. Even at a young age, many students remember where they were Sept. 11, 2001. The majority were in the classroom with their teachers trying to stay calm. Many were taken out of school by their parents.

Now, after 12 years, these same students, now in college, pay their respects in different ways. Some pray, some volunteer, some attend memorials, and some learn more about the attacks and watch documentaries.

MaryCarolyn Burt, a senior at Shippensburg University, feels that all Americans are lucky to be living in the country they do.

“Being a sociology student, I learn a lot about other cultures and how they live. With that being said, I have a very deep understanding of how lucky we are as Americans. On September 11, that feeling is always intensified,” Burt said. “I always remember back to that day and think of how upset my teachers and parents were. Sometimes I wish that I had been a little older when this happened so I could understand exactly what was happening.”

Burt also believes that Sept. 11 has made her a more patriotic person. “No matter what, I know that I will always be thankful that I was lucky enough to be born and raised here.”

Regardless of where any college students were when this tragedy struck the country, or how they pay our respects to those who lost their lives, this university has united in the past week to remember that tragic day. No matter how many years pass, the events of Sept.11 will be remembered by SU students.

“Remember the hours after September 11th when we came together as one to answer the attack against our homeland. We drew strength when our firefighters ran upstairs and risked their lives so that others might live; when rescuers rushed into smoke and fire at the Pentagon; when the men and women of Flight 93 sacrificed themselves to save our nation’s Capital; when flags were hanging from front porches all across America, and strangers became friends. It was the worst day we have ever seen, but it brought out the best in all of us.” – United States Secretary Of State John Kerry

“Time is passing. Yet, for the United States of America, there will be no forgetting September the 11th. We will remember every rescuer who died in honor. We will remember every family that lives in grief. We will remember the fire and ash, the last phone calls, the funerals of the children.” said President George W. Bush, November 11, 2001.

“All of a sudden there were people screaming. I saw people jumping out of the building. Their arms were flailing. I stopped taking pictures and started crying.” said Michael Walters, a freelance photojournalist in Manhattan.

“The attacks of September 11th were intended to break our spirit. Instead we have emerged stronger and more unified. We feel renewed devotion to the principles of political, economic, and religious freedom, the rule of law and respect for human life. We are more determined than ever to live our lives in freedom,” said Rudolph Giuliani, former mayor of New York City.

All quotes are from the website www.myacpa.org.


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